Week 2: Progress in Peru

Week 2: Progress in Peru

The only thing I could see were small, mint colored dim flames surrounded by darkness as I worked on the weld. Although intimidating at first, I grew confident and got comfortable with molten metal flying about and a brightness that would permanently blind me if I took my mask off.

Week 1: Perspiring in Peru

Week 1: Perspiring in Peru

Over the weekend, I mingled with the other volunteers – Sofia, Harris and Danny, and climatized to the area. We had a great time, as we relaxed at the beach, played pick up football with locals and shared a large gladiator pizza in the evening. All of us were prepared and excited for the upcoming working week.

Preparing for Peru

Preparing for Peru

It will be rewarding and life-changing yet I am out abroad for the longest time I have been and first on my own with unfamiliar people - perhaps like first arriving at university! I am looking forward to being in a new culture and the challenges that will come with it.

Stay Calm and Don’t Panic

Stay Calm and Don’t Panic

In school, most students going into a medical profession will learn some "cardinal rules of medicine". These “rules” are there to help you when things get tough and also to make sure you can help patients as best you can. This week, one of these rules, Rule #2, was tested out as I helped deliver a set of twins to a sweet first time mother.

When a Picture Can't Capture an Experience

When a Picture Can't Capture an Experience

They say pictures are worth a thousand words, and I'm sure many people would argue that they're worth more, but for me, this experience, this memory, this moment, was worth a million, and that's far too many for one picture to show.

Getting Over Expectations

Getting Over Expectations

You might be wondering “Well, if things went so great, then why did you title this post “Getting Over Expectations?”. While Murchinson was awesome and I would recommend it to anyone, what we didn’t expect was where we stayed Friday night when we first got to the park.

Acclimation Awkwardness

Acclimation Awkwardness

The big difference with being in Uganda is that all of that awkwardness is multiplied by being in a new country, learning a new culture, and being around people that don’t always speak English well.

Jitters of Excitement

Jitters of Excitement

New adventures have always been one of my favorite things, especially when it involves traveling to a new country. Since starting PA school at MUSC 2 years ago, traveling and volunteering haven’t exactly been the easiest things to do. So when I found out that I could combine my love of traveling and volunteering with school, I jumped at the unique opportunity to go to Uganda.

New Faces

New Faces

Rosa picked out questions from a bag and everyone went around to answer them. The questions were along the lines of "what is your dream" "where were you 10 years ago" "if you could have anything what could it be". Once again, I was reminded by the similarities we all share and the inherent connection we have with people all around the world.

The Mothers Club

The Mothers Club

Half an hour into it, we did an activity where we wrote on pieces of paper our fears and worries. That was where I noticed a change in the mood. As the papers were put into a box and pulled out anonymously by Katie to be written down on the white board, you could feel that each fear was resonating with the other women in the room. Fears of raising children correctly, having enough healthy food for everyone, having time to do everything and other worries of  mothers I know reminded me of how connected we all are.

FDOC From 3307 Miles Away

FDOC From 3307 Miles Away

I found this adjustment to be difficult, but I recognize that this is something that educators all over the world face and experience, and it was a true introduction to the power of teaching and the knowledge required of educators.

Final Thoughts

Final Thoughts

As I reflect on the past two weeks, I see personal growth. I see knowledge gained. I have only traveled internationally alone once before, and it was to China with a connection in Germany with a close friend waiting for me at the airport. The traveling adventures, to and from Peru, have forced me to act as an adult, fully responsible for myself. Nobody else was watching out for me.

My Last Days

My Last Days

I said goodbye to the clinic and we headed home for my last lunch with my host family. Lunch was a feast, and it was delicious. Mommy made fish, corn on the cob, baked corn, vinegar onions and peppers, three kinds of potatoes, and watermelon to conclude the meal. I was so full of food and of love.

Healing the Volunteers

Healing the Volunteers

Much of the material in the medicine class was interesting to me. Most notably, Dr. Neira reported that 34% of the children in the community the clinic serves have anemia. Contrary to popular belief, the problem in Peruvian families is not necessarily a lack of income, but a lack of wisdom on where to allocate their resources. Dr. Neira explained the difference between symptoms (described about a patient by a third party of by him or herself) and signs (a measurable result of illness). He then went through the process of a general examination with us, and taught us the main Spanish words to know when performing these. We then practiced general examinations on one another, and on one young girl from the community that had spent time with us during the class.

Spending the Holidays Abroad

Spending the Holidays Abroad

12:00 am: It was time for dinner: hot chocolate milk, turkey, applesauce, and fruitcake. After dinner, we opened presents. Mommy got us each a purse and earrings. The whole family, including myself, found great joy in watching Mary’s, our host sister, son open his Christmas presents. I was amazed by the thoughtful gifts exchanged between our family members.

Education is the Key

Education is the Key

This is where health education comes into play; it must start at the top of the ladder and trickle down. Government officials need to realize the flaw in this policy. Peruvian doctors need to understand the danger in over prescribing drugs to patients. Without understanding that bacterial strands can develop resistance to antibiotics, it seems like there would be no repercussions for giving out pills as if they were candy. Doctors also need to advocate for more restrictions on pharmaceutical distribution. Individuals need to be taught to take antibiotics seriously.